The Phone’s on Fire! Samsung’s not

Samsung smartphones have been on fire – not in sales, but literally on fire.

Image result for galaxy note 7
Samsung Galaxy Note 7 Phone

MAGGIE QU (11) | STAFF REPORTER

Samsung has been forced to discontinue one of its flagship phones – the Galaxy Note 7 – after a wave of concerns over the device’s safety.

Samsung announced the recall of 2.5 million Note 7s in early September of last year following numerous reports of the phones catching fire. This is considered one of the costliest product safety failures in tech history. Due to the many accidents, Samsung has decided to completely scrap the Note 7, two months after its launch, and recall every single one sold to be replaced by another product worldwide.

The science behind the explosions is that phones use lithium ion battery packs for their power, and the liquid inside the lithium ion is highly flammable. If the battery short circuits, the phone will heat up and eventually explode.

“This is the first time that I have seen a product recall go this badly wrong,” financial analyst Richard Windsor admitted. “When it comes to the damage that it will do to Samsung’s brand, we are in uncharted territory”.

Windsor’s words marked the truth as Samsung is currently dealing with a huge blow to their reputation after failing to resolve safety concerns. The world’s top maker of smartphones is met with huge financial and reputational costs.

Samsung will only have its existing models such as the Galaxy S7 edge to rely on, which gives numerous chances to rivals like Apple to overtake the company with its latest iPhone 7.

Although taking a big toll on profit and popularity, Samsung did the right thing in scrapping the phone and prioritizing the safety of their users. There will undoubtedly be future concerns over the firm’s quality control however, by offering to replace the phone, Samsung is doing its best to improve their reputation.

A grade 11 student from St. Robert acknowledged the plunge of Samsung’s reputation but is still willing to purchase a different model from the same company, only hesitating a little before completing more research on the phone. Similarly, the fact that Samsung admitted and didn’t cover up the faulty phone provides reasons for consumers to once again build trust in them, as they have shown their eagerness to improve.

These unfortunate events have happened, yet let’s hope they have served as a caution for Samsung and other companies to take careful measures in the production process.