1,400 Canadians Gone Each Year

Canada’s economy made up of immigrants are ordered to be removed for residency non-compliance.

Canadian citizenship and immigration centre

Maggie Qu (11) STAFF REPORTER

Each year, around 1,400 Canadian immigrants are cut off at the border and ordered removed from the country for failing to fulfill their residency obligations.

Newcomers have the option to restore their resident status by appealing to a tribunal under humanitarian considerations. Lawrence Wong, an immigration lawyer stated “the tribunal is supposed to be immigrants’ last resort as the Parliament has given it the discretionary power to give immigrants a second chance if they breach the law.” Although an opportunity, government data recorded only one in 10 immigrants succeed in restoring their residency.

Canada’s immigration laws requires permanent residents to be physically present in the country for at least 730 days in every five-year period, or their residency will be revoked. Data from 2010 to 2014 according to the Canada Border Services Agency notes that an average of 1,423 permanent residents a year were stopped at the border for incompliance to the law. Once a removal order is issued, the changes of saving the permanent resident status is limited.

If the numbers continue to follow the current trend or even the possibility of rising higher, Canada’s economy might just be at risk. The country consists of immigrants from all over the world and their contribution to society is what’s keeping Canada going. This not only slows the economy but in kicking residents out, it brings fear upon potential immigrants and may decrease the number of people applying for citizenship. What happened to the peaceful and friendly Canada?

Although on the surface it appears that Canada is being harsh to these immigrants, Canada is only doing its job and regulating policies. If Canada allows the same immigrants get away with defying the law, what would stop others from doing the same?

Canada is firm on its judgement and is sympathetic enough to permit immigrants to propose their circumstance to the immigration appeal division, on errors in law or humanitarian and compassionate grounds. If immigrants want to avoid this mess, the easiest thing to do is simply follow the law.